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Hillsborough County, FL – 2020 General Election

Below is the information I have found on the various candidates and constitutional amendments for the 2020 general election in Hillsborough County, Florida for my district. You can find your own sample ballot here. As noted, I’m politically an independent but registered as a Democrat so I can vote in Florida’s primaries. I generally try not to endorse candidates in my election guides.

(NOTE 09-12-2020: If there is information missing, it’s because I just got a copy of the ballot and am still looking for information.)

President/Vice-President

I’m fairly confident you’re not on my website looking for information about the candidates for President/Vice-President. Even so, I went ahead and put together the standard links I do for candidates.

Donald J. Trump & Michael R. Pence

Party: Republican
Background Information: Trump was in business and real estate. Pence was governor of Indiana.
Finances: Federal Election Commission
Websites: campaign website,

Joseph R. Biden & Kamala D. Harris

Party: Democratic
Background Information: Biden and Harris have been US Senators. Harris was also the attorney general of California.
Finances: Federal Election Commission
Websites: campaign website,

Jo Jorgensen & Jeremy “Spike” Cohen

Party: Libertarian
Background Information: Jo Jorgensen worked in the tech industry before becoming a professor at Clemson University, where she now teaches. Cohen is a former web-designer turned podcast and libertarian activist.
Finances: Federal Election Commission
Websites: campaign website, Twitter, Wikipedia – Jorgensen, Wikipedia – Cohen,

Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente & Darcy G. Richardson

Party: Reform Party (in Florida), Alliance Party (in other states)
Background Information: de la Fuente is in business, inheriting his father’s businesses. He’s wealthy and has engaged in some sketchy business practices. Richardson is an author and blogger focusing on third party candidates.
Finances: Federal Election Commission
Websites: campaign website, Twitter, Wikipedia – de la Fuente, Wikipedia – Richardson,

Gloria La Riva & Sunil Freeman

Party: Party for Socialism and Liberation (PSL) and the Peace and Freedom Party
Background Information: La Riva is an activist. Freeman is an author and activist.
Finances: Federal Election Commission
Websites: campaign website, Twitter, Wikipedia – La Riva,

Howie Hawkins & Angela Nicole Walker

Party: Green Party
Background Information: Hawkins is an activist and politician. Walker was a professional driver before becoming a union representative.
Finances: Federal Election Commission
Websites: campaign website, Twitter, Wikipedia – Hawkins, Wikipedia – Walker,
Endorsements:

Don Blankenship & William Mohr

Party: Constitution Party
Background Information: Blankenship was a coal company CEO and a convicted criminal. Mohr is self-employed in building and construction.
Finances: Federal Election Commission
Websites: campaign website, Twitter, Wikipedia – Blankenship, Wikipedia – Mohr,
Endorsements:

Representative in Congress District 14

Christine Y. Quinn

Party: Republican
Background Information: Originally from California. Graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in Child Development. Small business owner selling spices.
Finances: Federal Election Commission
Websites: campaign website, Twitter, Facebook
Endorsements:

Kathy Castor

Party: Democratic
Background Information: Incumbent candidate. Daughter of a well-known Florida politician, Betty Castor. Graduated from Emory for undergrad and Florida State for law school. Was elected to Hillsborough County Board of Commissioners in 2002. Practiced law until being elected to the US House in 2006.
Finances: Federal Election Commission
Websites: campaign website, Twitter, Wikipedia
Endorsements:

State Attorney, 13th Judicial Circuit

Mike Perotti

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Andrew Warren

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

State Representative District 62

Angel S. Urbina Capo

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Susan L. Valdés

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Laurie Rodriguez-Person

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Sheriff

Chad Chronister

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Gary Pruitt

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Ron McMullen

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Property Appraiser

D.C. Goutoufas

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Bob “Coach” Henriquez

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Tax Collector

TK Mathew

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Nancy C. Millan

Party: Democrat
Background: Has worked for the tax collector’s office for decades (31 years), rising through the ranks; served on a number of boards, including the Board of Trinity School for Children from 2005-2008 (full disclosure – my son attended Trinity School for Children from about 2012 until 2020);
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites: election website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram
Personal Commentary: I received a flyer for Nancy Millan that was riddled with typos. That lack of detail bothers me. Millan is also purchasing ads on Google’s search engine. The Tax Collector’s website, hillstax.org, does use Cloudfare to protect against DDOS attacks, though the settings for the protection wouldn’t let me access the website, so someone set it up wrong.

Board of County Commissioners District 3

Maura Cruz Lanz

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Gwen Myers

Party: Democrat
Background: Tampa native; graduate of FAMU; worked for Hillsborough County for 25 years; now retired; served on a variety of local boards (e.g., Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Council;
Endorsements: County Commissioner Pat Kemp among others
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites: election website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram
Personal Commentary: Likes the color green. Platform seems to be focused on public transit.

Board of County Commissioners District 6

Sandra L. Murman

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Patricia “Pat” Kemp

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Justice of the Supreme Court

Shall Justice Carlos G. Muñiz of the Supreme Court be retained in office?

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

District Court of Appeal

Shall Judge Drew Atkinson of the Second District Court of Appeal be retained in office?

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Shall Judge Morris Silberman of the Second District Court of Appeal be retained in office?

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Shall Judge Daniel H. Sleet of the Second District Court of Appeal be retained in office?

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Shall Judge Andrea Teves Smith of the Second District Court of Appeal be retained in office?

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

County Court Judge Group 7

Monique Scott

Party: nonpartisan race
Background: BA in Criminology and Psychology from USF; former Tampa police officer (left for health reasons) and public school teacher; worked as an assistant state attorney; accident attorney; volunteers with epilepsy groups; married to a chiropractor
Endorsements:
Personal Commentary:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Judicial Candidate Forum responses
Websites: election website, Franchi Law firm

Bill Yanger

Background: Admitted to Florida Bar in 1989; admitted to Texas bar in 1986; graduate of Jesuit High School; went to University of Florida for undergrad; South Texas College of Law for law degree; founder of Yanger Law Group; works on complex business litigation; former Chair of the Tampa Chamber of Commerce; Board of Fellows member at the University of Tampa (full disclosure, I am a professor at the University of Tampa); Presbyterian – goes to Palma Ceia Presbyterian Church
Endorsements: local firefighters unions, Tampa City Council members Guido Maniscalco, Charlie Miranda, and Luis Viera; Tampa Bay Times
Personal Commentary: He drives a truck, per his flyer he circulated (seems important to him).
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Judicial Candidate Forum responses
Websites: election website, Facebook, Instagram

School Board Member District 1

In the primary election, no candidate received sufficient votes to win the election outright. The two candidates below are the top vote getters and are competing in this runoff election.

Nadia Combs

Party: nonpartisan race
Background: BA in Social Studies Education and MA in Educational Leadership from USF; taught in Japan; taught in Hillsborough County Schools for 10 years; founded a company in 2005 as part of the Supplemental Education Services – provides free tutoring to students in Hillsborough County; opened Brighton Learning tutoring center in 2014
Endorsements: Tampa Bay Times
Personal Commentary:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites: election website, Brighton Learning

Steve Cona

Party: nonpartisan race
Background: Tampa native; Bachelor’s from USF; CEO of Associated Builders and Contractors Florida Gulf Coast Chapter; on the Board of Trustees of Hillsborough Community College; platform is to improve Florida’s skilled labor force; incumbent
Endorsements:
Personal Commentary: Platform is three-fold: fiscal accountability, school security, and addressing maintenance problems in schools. Raised almost 10 times as much money as all the other candidates combined. Pretty telling that the Tampa Bay Times didn’t endorse him as the incumbent.
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites: election website,

School Board Member District 7

In the primary election, no candidate received sufficient votes to win the election outright. The two candidates below are the top vote getters and are competing in this runoff election.

Lynn Gray

Party: nonpartisan race
Background: worked for over 20 years as a teacher in Tampa; incumbent on the school board; platform – healthier kids (healthier foods and recess); more support for students; improved literacy
Endorsements: Tampa Bay Times
Personal Commentary:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites: election website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram

Sally A. Harris

Party: nonpartisan race
Background: South Tampa native; owner of Circle C Ranch Academy – early care and education company; focus is on safety, discipline, and management
Endorsements:
Personal Commentary: She seems to care more about policing the kids than educating them.
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites: election website

Soil and Water Conservation District Group 2

Erik S. Challenger

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Michael Harvey

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Karen Cox Jaroch

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Douglas “Doug” Rivero

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Soil and Water Conservation District Group 4

Sonja P. Brookins

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

D.B. “Brig” Maynard

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

Mark Proctor

Party:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

No. 1 Constitutional Amendment

Citizenship Requirement to Vote in Florida Elections

This amendment provides that only United States Citizens who are at least eighteen years of age, a permanent resident of Florida, and registered to vote, as provided by law, shall be qualified to vote in a Florida election.

Because the proposed amendment is not expected to result in any changes to the voter registration process in Florida, it will have no impact on state or local government costs or revenue. Further, it will have no effect on the state’s economy.

My Translation:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

No. 2 Constitutional Amendment

Raising Florida’s Minimum Wage

Raises minimum wage to $10.00 per hour effective September 30th, 2021. Each September 30th thereafter, minimum wage shall increase by $1.00 per hour until the minimum wage reaches $15.00 per hour on September 30th, 2026. From that point forward, future minimum wage increases shall revert to being adjusted annually for inflation starting September 30th, 2027.

State and local government costs will increase to comply with the new minimum wage levels. Additional annual wage costs will be approximately $16 million in 2022, increasing to about $540 million in 2027 and thereafter. Government actions to mitigate these costs are unlikely to produce material savings. Other government costs and revenue impacts, both positive and negative, are not quantifiable.

This proposed constitutional amendment is estimated to have a net negative impact on the state budget. This impact may result in higher taxes or a loss of government services in order to maintain a balanced state budget as required by the constitution.

My Translation: This amendment would increase Florida’s minimum wage over time. I am fascinated by the estimates that are included with this amendment. They seem like a straightforward effort to try to dissuade voters from approving this.
Background Information: Florida’s minimum wage does increase slightly with inflation at present. However, as of 01/01/2020, minimum wage in Florida is $8.56.
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites: sponsor’s website,
Endorsements:

No. 3 Constitutional Amendment

All Voters Vote in Primary Elections for State Legislature, Governor, and Cabinet

Allows all registered voters to vote in primaries for state legislature, governor, and cabinet regardless of political party affiliation. All candidates for an office, including party nominated candidates, appear on the same primary ballot. Two highest vote getters advance to general election. If only two candidates qualify, no primary is held and winner is determined in general election. Candidate’s party affiliation may appear on ballot as provided by law. Effective January 1, 2024.

It is probably that the proposed amendment will result in additional local government costs to conduct elections in Florida. The Financial Impact Estimating Conference projects that the combined costs across counties will range from $5.2 million to $5.8 million for each of the first three election cycles occurring in even-numbered years after the amendment’s effective date, with the costs for each of the intervening years dropping to less than $450,000. With respect to state costs for oversight, the additional costs for administering elections are expected to be minimal. Further, there are no revenues linked to voting in Florida. Since there is no impact on state costs or revenues, there will be no impact on the state’s budget. While the proposed amendment will result in an increase in local expenditures, this change is expected to be below the threshold that would produce a statewide economic impact.

My Translation:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

No. 4 Constitutional Amendment

Voter Approval of Constitutional Amendments

Requires all proposed amendments or revisions to the state constitution to be approved by the voters in two elections, instead of one, in order to take effect. The proposal applies the current thresholds for passage to each of the two elections.

It is probably that the proposed amendment will result in additional state and local government costs to conduct elections in Florida. Overall, these costs will vary from election cycle to election cycle depending on the unique circumstances of each ballot and cannot be estimated at this time. The key factors determining cost include the number of amendments appearing for the second time on each ballot and the length of those amendments. Since the maximum state cost is likely less than $1 million per cycle but the impact cannot be discretely quantified, the change to the state’s budget is unknown. Similarly, the economic impact cannot be modelled, although the spending increase is expected to be below the threshold that would produce a statewide economic impact. Because there are no revenues linked to voting in Florida, there will be no impact on government taxes or fees.

The financial impact of this amendment cannot be determined due to ambiguities and uncertainties surrounding the amendment’s impact.

My Translation: Per this article in the Tampa Bay Times, it’s not clear who funded this amendment, but it appears to be right-leaning corporations that are frustrated with the ability of Floridians to occasionally govern themselves. Powerful entities from political parties to corporations in Florida are frustrated when the citizens actually enact legislation that a super-majority wants. This is another attempt by shadowy figures to attempt to reduce the ability of the people to govern themselves by making it harder to pass a constitutional amendment. I’ll go ahead and make my position on this clear – vote NO on Amendment 4.
Background Information: Currently, in order for an amendment to be added to the Florida constitution it requires just one election and a supermajority of voters to approve it of 60%.
Finances: I have not found any information on the finances.
Websites: sponsor’s website
Endorsements:

No. 5 Constitutional Amendment

Limitations on Homestead Property Tax Assessments; increased portability period to transfer accrued benefit

Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution, effective January 1, 2021, to increase, from 2 years to 3 years, the period of time during which accrued Save-Our-Homes benefits may be transferred from a prior homestead to a new homestead.

My Translation:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

No. 6 Constitutional Amendment

Ad Valorem Tax Discount for Spouses of Certain Deceased Veterans Who Had Permanent, Combat-Related Disabilities

Provides that the homestead property tax discount for certain veterans with permanent combat-related disabilities carries over to such veteran’s surviving spouse who holds legal or beneficial title to, and who permanently resides on, the homestead property, until he or she remarries or sells or otherwise disposes of the property. The discount may be transferred to a new homestead property of the surviving spouse under certain conditions. The amendment takes effect January 1, 2021.

My Translation:
Background Information:
Finances (per voterfocus.com)
Websites:
Endorsements:

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Hiking in Silver Springs State Park

I was invited to give a presentation to a freethought group in Ocala and thought it might be a good opportunity to explore a little more of Florida.  I looked up hikes near Ocala and found Silver Springs State Park.  From what we were told by some of the people where I gave my presentation, Silver Springs used to be a privately owned amusement park and Florida’s first tourist attraction. Apparently, the park fell on hard times and eventually was taken over by the state.  Now it’s a state park with boat rides on the springs and some hiking trails.

My presentation was supposed to be in the early afternoon, so we decided to go to Silver Springs State Park in the morning, try to get a hike in, go to my presentation, and then come back for another hike afterward.

We got a bit later start than we had hoped as we had to pick up a few supplies before we left Tampa.  We got to the park around 11:30 and walked through the main area where they sell boat rides and have a restaurant.

Toren and Ryan at Silver Spring State Park
Toren and Ryan at Silver Spring State Park

We managed to get in a short hike in the primary part of the park before we had to leave for my presentation. We did a newly created hike called Creek Trail, which wasn’t much of a hike.  It looped around in a circle, with Silver Springs Blvd. on one side and Silver River on the other side.  It did give a bit of a sample of what Florida’s natural land looks like, but it was a very quick taste.  Here’s the route:

We had to leave after the hike to get to my presentation on time.  The presentation went well and then we went to a late lunch with some of the people who were at the presentation.  After lunch, we headed back into the park to do another hike.  This one was a bit longer.  It took us through some Florida wilderness and eventually to the Silver River, as seen in this photo.

Debi and Toren by Silver River
Debi and Toren by Silver River

The trail then looped back around.  This was called the Swamp Trail; here’s the route:

After that hike it was getting dark, so we headed out for a bite to eat and headed home.  It was a fun little outing.  No elevation gain, of course, but a good chance to stretch our legs in Florida wilderness.

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Toren has a new bike

We found a two-wheel bike for Toren on Craig’s List for $10 (plus helmet).  It has training wheels.  Toren took to it like it was old news.  I have some video of him riding the bike the first time that I’ll post soon.

I had to get a new bike rack for my car since my old one doesn’t work on the new Prius.  With that in place, I took him out for his first big ride on Sunday on the Upper Tampa Bay Trail.  Here’s our route:

I was actually impressed with how well he did.  We rode about 3.2 miles over about 1 1/2 hours.  He did stop to pick flowers three or four times, and on the way back I had to coax him to continue by promising him an ice cream cone at McDonald’s, but he did pretty good.

(Hat tip to Scott Husband for recommending the trail.  It’s a beautiful trail, wide, and well-maintained.)

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2 reasons Florida is cool and one attraction to avoid

As luck would have it, the latest space shuttle launch coincided with our spring break. The only thing I really, really wanted to do upon moving to Florida was see a shuttle launch in person. So, when I saw a chance for us to go observe a launch, we jumped at it. Given it is our spring break, we decided to turn our trip across peninsular Florida into a day-long excursion.

We left Tampa around 11:00 and drove to Lake Wales, FL to see the Bok Tower Sanctuary. Our neighbor lent us a book of one gas tank trips from Tampa and one of the attractions listed in it was Bok Sanctuary. It’s basically a really nice garden with a unique tower. The tower sits on the highest point in peninsular Florida (we’ve been to the highest point in Florida, Britton Hill). We weren’t sure what to expect, but were very pleasantly surprised.

On the way in to the Sanctuary you drive through miles of orange trees. Everyone knows Florida is famous for oranges. Now I know where they grow:

picking oranges

You can also see the tower in the distance:

tower distance

It costs $10 per adult to enter the “sanctuary,” but it is worth it. You walk through the visitor’s center, which has a museum and video, then you can wander around the gardens, all the way up to the tower. It’s actually a carillon tower, which means it has bells and plays music. We arrived around 12:45; the first concert of the day starts at 1:00. We walked around in the gardens while the music played and snapped photos. It’s very picturesque, with all sorts of foliage and even some swans.

tower

This is the tower from the far end of the reflection pool.

ryan by tower

Here’s Ryan behind the tower.

debi swan

Here’s Debi pretending this is a friendly swan (it kept inching closer and trying to take a piece out of our legs).

These last two are kind of cool. Calvin Coolidge dedicated the sanctuary in the 1920s. Apparently, while he was there, he and his wife planted palm trees. There was no mention of this in any of the information in the park, but as we walked around, I saw these plaques indicating which palm trees they had planted. I’m standing next to the one planted by President Coolidge; Debi is by the one planted by First Lady Coolidge (I apologize for the gendered titles, but they are what they are):

trees - ryan

trees - debi

We spent a good couple hours at the sanctuary then headed out to find another local attraction – Spook Hill. That same guidebook suggests this attraction. As an inveterate fan of the obscure, I thought it might be cool to find some sort of local optical illusion – a road that is situated such that gravity seemingly pulls you uphill. I’m sure there are places like that around the U.S., but not this time.

It took us a good 30 minutes just to find this place as the signage around town is terrible. I was beginning to think that the mystique surrounding Spook Hill was actually that there is no Spook Hill – it’s just a myth and you drive around trying to find it, which makes it “spooky.”

(This actually gave me an idea that I thought would be kind of fun if you live in a small town – come up with some weird “attraction” that you think people would actually go out of their way to see. Then go out around your town and put up signs with arrows and names that send people in a very large circle around town but never actually send you to an attraction. Then build a web page talking about how amazing this attraction is. Once you start getting hits, go see if people start showing up and follow them around, laughing. Okay, that’s mean, but it would be funny.)

We eventually found the place and then busted up laughing. Remember, the whole idea is that your car is supposed to role in such a way that it is spooky. You might think that means rolling in the direction opposite of what you would think. You would be wrong. I was so disappointed I filmed the whole thing (well, Debi did while I ran through it).

After watching several other people fall for this ridiculous attraction, we decided we’d had enough and left. Final word: Spook Hill is the dumbest attraction I’ve ever visited. Don’t go!

After wasting an hour at Spook Hill we headed toward Titusville to set up camp and watch the shuttle launch. We arrived around 5:00 pm and found there were already about 50 people camped out at Space View Park. Many of the front row spots were taken, but we found some that were not and set up camp. I had researched online the best places to view the launch. Without spending anything, Space View Park is the place to go. But it fills up fast. We got there at 5:00, almost 10 hours before the launch, and barely got a front row spot. By about 10:00 pm people were stacking up several rows deep. By the actual time of the launch, there were probably 800 to 1,000 people in the park (and it’s tiny) and people were backed up quite far. We knew we had time to kill, so we brought Scrabble and Stratego to play while it was light, then had books and games on our handhelds to keep us entertained. We also brought blankets and pillows and got in a couple hours of sleep.

Amazingly, the launch went off without a hitch (a first in a long time) and I got this footage.

I actually filmed it in hi-def and am happy to share that footage with anyone interested (it’s still grainy until ignition because it is so dark, but once it lights up, the picture is amazing). It was a very cool launch, even though it was short-lived. The shuttle took off, lit up the sky, then disappeared into the low cloud cover. It was just a cool event.

We waited a while for the traffic to clear out, but we still ended up getting stuck for about an hour. We got home around 6:00 am and crashed for a few hours before starting the day Tuesday.

Overall, I’d say Florida is pretty freaking cool! Bok Sanctuary is amazingly beautiful and the launch was awesome. Spook Hill should be nuked, but you can’t win them all.

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FL-Britton Hill

Summit Date

December 21st, 2003; around 9:30 am

Party

Ryan & Debi Cragun

Trip Report

We had driven over 700 miles the day before, visited Alabama’s highpoint, and spent the night in Elba, AL at Olde South Inn bed & breakfast. The owner was great and the accommodations were very nice. We were on our way to Orlando for a week vacation and decided to take a slightly different route to include my final two highpoints in the South.

Elba is only about 50 miles north of Lakewood/Britton Hill, so we arrived fairly early. We nearly drove right past the park and highpoint as the signage from the north isn’t particularly great and the park is pretty small.

When we pulled in, we were pretty disappointed. It’s not a very nice park. It doesn’t look like a lot of effort has been put into making the park nice or keeping it up. The restrooms looked pretty nasty; thankfully, we didn’t need to use them.

It was also surprisingly chilly, probably in the mid-40s with the wind chill. We hopped out of the car and while Debi set up the tripod, I snapped a bunch of pictures. We took a few pictures of us by the monument before Debi dashed back to the car to get warm. I then snapped a few pictures of the marker signs before we left.

This isn’t a very pretty highpoint and there definitely isn’t much to see here. I believe I saw a trailhead near the monument, but we didn’t take the time to explore it. We probably spent a total of 5 minutes here, and, sadly, it was probably about 4 minutes too long. The only nice things to see at this site are the monument itself and the view to the east. I would recommend a quick stop here before heading on to somewhere more interesting.

Panorama

Directions

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